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punch 1 (pŭnch)
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n.
1. A tool for circular or other piercing: a leather punch.
2. A tool for forcing a pin, bolt, or rivet in or out of a hole.
3. A tool for stamping a design on a surface.
4. A tool for making a countersink.
v. punched, punch·ing, punch·es
v.tr.
1. To make (a hole or opening), as by using a punch or similar implement.
2. To make a hole in (something), as by using a punch: The conductor punched my train ticket.
v.intr.
To pierce something; make a hole or opening: My foot punched through the ice.

[Middle English pounce, punche, from Old French poinçon, ponchon; see PUNCHEON1. V., from Middle English pouncen, punchen, to prick, from Old French poinçoner, ponchoner, to emboss with a punch; see PUNCH2.]

puncher n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
punch 2 (pŭnch)
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tr.v. punched, punch·ing, punch·es
1.
a. To hit with a sharp blow of the fist.
b. To drive (the fist) into or through something.
c. To drive (a ball, for example) with the fist.
d. To make (a hole) by thrusting the fist.
2.
a. Archaic To poke or prod with a stick.
b. Western US To herd (cattle).
3. To depress (the accelerator of a car) forcefully.
4.
a. To depress (a key or button, for example) in order to activate a device or perform an operation: punched the "repeat" key.
b. To enter (data) by keying: punched in the number on the computer.
5. Baseball To hit (a ball) with a quick short swing.
n.
1. A blow with the fist.
2. Impressive or effective force; impact. See Synonyms at vigor.
Phrasal Verbs:
punch in
1. To check in formally at a job upon arrival.
2. To enter data on a keypad or similar device.
punch out
1. To check out formally at a job upon departure.
2. To hit (someone) with a powerful punch, often so as to render unconscious.
3. Baseball To call (a batter) out on a third strike, often using a punching motion as a signal.
punch up
To enliven or enhance: punched up the report by adding some relevant cartoons.
Idioms:
beat to the punch
To make the first decisive move: a marketing team that beat all the competitors to the punch.
punch the clock
1. To register one's arrive or departure at a job.
2. To be employed at a job with regular hours.

[Middle English punchen, to thrust, prod, prick, from Old French poinçonner, ponchonner, to emboss with a punch, from poinçon, ponchon, pointed tool; see PUNCHEON1.]

punchless adj.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
punch 3 (pŭnch)
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n.
A beverage of fruit juices and sometimes a soft drink or carbonated water, often spiced and mixed with a wine or liquor base.

[From Hindi pañc-, five, probably as used in pañcāmt, a mixture of milk, yogurt, ghee, sugar, and honey used in Hindu ritual, from Sanskrit pañcāmtam : pañca, five; see penkwe in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + amtam, amrita.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
Punch (pŭnch)
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n.
The quarrelsome hook-nosed husband of Judy in the comic puppet show Punch and Judy.
Idiom:
pleased as Punch
Highly pleased; gratified.

[Short for PUNCHINELLO.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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