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cor·re·spond (kôrĭ-spŏnd, kŏr-)
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intr.v. cor·re·spond·ed, cor·re·spond·ing, cor·re·sponds
1. To be in agreement, harmony, or conformity.
2. To be similar or equivalent in character, quantity, origin, structure, or function: English navel corresponds to Greek omphalos.
3. To communicate by letter, usually over a period of time.

[French correspondre, from Medieval Latin correspondēre : Latin com-, com- + respondēre, to respond; see RESPOND.]

Synonyms: correspond, conform, harmonize, coincide, accord, agree
These verbs all indicate a compatibility between people or things. Correspond refers to similarity in form, nature, function, character, or structure: "Scientific statements may or may not correspond to the facts of the physical world" (George Soros).
Conform stresses correspondence in essence or basic characteristics, sometimes to an ideal or established standard: "Home was the place where I was forced to conform to someone else's image of who and what I should be" (bell hooks).
Harmonize implies the combination or arrangement of elements in a pleasing whole: The print on the curtains harmonized with the striped sofa.
Coincide stresses exact agreement: "His interest happily coincided with his duty" (Edward A. Freeman).
Accord implies harmony, unity, or consistency, as in essential nature: "The creed [upon which America was founded] was widely seen as both progressive and universalistic: It accorded with the future, and it was open to all" (Everett Carll Ladd).
Agree may indicate mere lack of incongruity or discord, although it often suggests acceptance of ideas or actions and thus accommodation: We finally agreed on a price for the house. See Also Synonyms at assent.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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