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far (fär)
Share:
adv. far·ther (färthər), far·thest (färthĭst) or fur·ther (fûrthər) or fur·thest (fûrthĭst)
1. To, from, or at a considerable distance: a cat that had strayed far from home.
2. To, from, or at a much earlier or later time: a movie that takes place far in the future.
3. To a considerable degree; much: felt far better yesterday; eyes that seemed far too close together.
4. To an advanced point or stage: a brilliant student who will go far.
adj. farther, farthest or further or furthest
1.
a. Being at considerable distance; remote: a far country.
b. Going back a considerable extent in time: the far past.
2. More distant than another: the far corner.
3. Extensive or lengthy: a far trek.
4. Far-seeing and comprehensive in thought or outlook: a commander of far vision.
5. Marked by political views of the most advanced or extreme nature: the far right; the far left.
6.
a. Being on the right side of an animal or a vehicle.
b. Being the animal or vehicle on the right.
Idioms:
by far
To the most extreme or evident degree: She is by far the best executive in the company.
far and away
By a great margin: is far and away the smartest student in the class.
far and wide
Everywhere: looked far and wide for the lost puppy.
far be it from (someone)
Used to deflect responsibility for making a statement that might not be received well: Far be it from me to criticize, but I find your handwriting to be very sloppy.
far cry
1. A long way: stuck at the airport in Memphis, a far cry from Maine.
2. Something that is very different from something else: This food is a far cry from what we got in the cafeteria.
far from
Not at all; anything but: You are far from a failure.
far gone
In an advanced state of a process, especially an undesirable state that is beyond improvement or reversal: "The fire was issuing from a long straw-stack, which was so far gone as to preclude a possibility of saving it" (Thomas Hardy).
far out
Slang Used to express amazement or approval.
how far
To what degree, distance, or extent: didn't know how far to believe them; tried to decide how far she could ski in such cold.
so far
1. Up to the present moment: So far there's been no word from them.
2. To a limited extent: You can go only so far on five dollars.
thus far
Up to this point; so far: Our success has been limited thus far.

[Middle English, from Old English feor; see per1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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