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round 1 (round)
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adj. round·er, round·est
1.
a. Being such that every part of the surface or the circumference is equidistant from the center: a round ball.
b. Moving in or forming a circle.
c. Shaped like a cylinder; cylindrical.
d. Rather rounded in shape: the child's round face.
e. Full in physique; plump: a round figure.
2.
a. Linguistics Formed or articulated with the lips in a rounded shape: a round vowel.
b. Full in tone; sonorous.
3. Whole or complete; full: a round dozen.
4.
a. Mathematics Having been rounded.
b. Not exact, especially when expressed as a multiple of 10; approximate: a round estimate.
5. Large; considerable: a round sum of money.
6. Brought to satisfactory conclusion or completion; finished.
7.
a. Outspoken; blunt: a round scolding.
b. Done with full force; unrestrained: gave me a round thrashing.
n.
1.
a. Something, such as a circle, disk, globe, or ring, that is round.
b. A circle formed of various things.
c. Movement around a circle or about an axis.
2. A rung or crossbar, as one on a ladder or chair.
3. A cut of beef from the part of the thigh between the rump and the shank.
4. An assembly of people; a group.
5. A round dance.
6.
a. A complete course, succession, or series: a round of parties; a round of negotiations.
b. often rounds A course of customary or prescribed actions, duties, or places: physicians' rounds.
7. A complete range or extent.
8. One drink for each person in a gathering or group: Let me buy the next round.
9. A single outburst, as of applause or cheering.
10.
a. A single shot or volley.
b. Ammunition for a single shot or volley.
11. A specified number of arrows shot from a specified distance to a target in archery.
12. Sports & Games A unit of play that occupies a specified time, constitutes a certain number of plays, or allows each player a turn, especially the 18-hole sequence played in golf or one of the periods in a boxing match.
13. Music A composition for two or more voices in which each voice enters at a different time with the same melody.
v. round·ed, round·ing, rounds
v.tr.
1. To make round or curved: rounded his lips in surprise; rounded off the end of the board.
2. Linguistics To pronounce with rounded lips; labialize.
3. To fill out; make plump.
4. To bring to completion or perfection; finish. Often used with out or off: The new dog rounded out our household. The speaker rounded off his lecture with a joke.
5. Mathematics To approximate (a real number) by a nearby rational number with a specified level of precision. When rounded to the nearest hundred, 286 becomes 300. When rounded to the nearest tenth, 1.63 becomes 1.6.
6.
a. To make a turn about or to the other side of: rounded a bend in the road.
b. To make a complete circuit of; go or pass around: rounded the entire peninsula.
7. Archaic To encompass; surround:
v.intr.
1. To become round or curved.
2. To take a circular course; complete or partially complete a circuit: racecars rounding into the final lap.
3. To turn about, as on an axis: rounded and came back across the field.
4. To become filled out or plump.
5. To develop into satisfactory completion or perfection: is rounding into a fine quarterback.
adv.
1. In a circular progression or movement; around.
2. With revolutions: wheels moving round.
3. To a specific place or person: called round for the pastor; sent round for the veterinarian.
prep.
1. Around.
2. From the beginning to the end of; throughout: a plant that grows round the year.
Phrasal Verbs:
round on
To turn on and assail.
round up
1. To seek out and bring together; gather.
2. To herd (cattle) together from various places.
Idioms:
in the round
1. With the stage in the center of the audience.
2. Fully shaped so as to stand free of a background: a sculpture in the round.
make/go the rounds
1. To go from place to place, as on business or for entertainment: a delivery truck making the rounds; students going the rounds in the entertainment district.
2. To be communicated or passed from person to person: The news quickly made the rounds. A piece of juicy gossip is going the rounds.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman rounde, variant of Old French rond, ultimately from Vulgar Latin *retundus, from Latin rotundus; see ret- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

roundness n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 
round 2 (round)
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tr.v. round·ed, round·ing, rounds
Archaic
To whisper.

[Middle English rounden, from Old English rūnian, from rūn, a secret.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2017 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
 

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